The American Compact: An agreement with the American People

I found this on MYDD tonight (hat tip to Jerome)… there’s some good stuff here:

The American Compact
An agreement with the American People

Free public education pre-K through post-12, reflecting that a high school diploma alone is no longer the ticket to the middle class

National standards for fair federal elections including a common ballot design and common 24 hour election day (10pm EST the first Monday in November to 10pm EST the first Tuesday in November, worldwide)

Nonpartisan congressional redistricting (and at the state level, nonpartisan legislative redistricting)

Fair and Simple progressive no-deductions income and payroll tax

Fair Social Security funding (lift the income limit, add progressivity) to guarantee solvency and meet our moral obligation

Health care for every child as a step to health care for every American

Expanding, retraining and reequipping the National Guard as our “first line of defense” for Homeland Security. Return the militia to its role of protecting its community.

“For the Troops” – Spend tax dollars on the military prioritized to support the soldiers, sailors and airmen, not enrich the defense contractors

Pass legislation to enforce equal protection under the laws for all Americans as guaranteed by the Constitution

Progress toward energy independence by applying American technology for common-sense conservation and the use of government grants and incentives to encourage purchase and installation of home and community based sources of solar, wind and other inexhaustible, renewable energy.

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6 Responses to The American Compact: An agreement with the American People

  1. Ginny in Co says:

    Very good. I suspect a lot of us have been thinking about an ’06 Democratic version of Contract with America. It would take a lot to sell it as something more than a ticket
    Congress. That the candidates wouldn’t get there and forget it.

    It’s missing a crucial element: the media. The deregulation stuff needs to be modified or reversed.

  2. Ginny

    It can be expanded in quite a few ways… getting it to sell is another thing.

  3. kj says:

    Well, I’m nothing if not constantly thinking of ways to sell the progressive vision to red staters. And sometimes it really is as easy to think about as how to sell something.

    We boil down the issues that matter to us most, and then we hammer, hammer, hammer out copy that expresses, in the simpliest terms possible, what those issues are. If anyone in our local community is actually DOING any of those things, we highlight their actions in as many ways as possible.

    I chant LTE all the time, but the thing is, they work. So does casual conversation. And since most blog posters also write, write guest editorials to the newspaper. Keep it under 500 words and there’s a chance it will be printed.

    We have to not only be our own media, we have to be our own echo chamber. And I don’t know about the rest, but I’m tired of talking about Bush. I’ve been tired of talking about him since 2000. I want to keep talking about what Kerry, etc. are doing.

    And I applaud this blog for highlighting those very things.

  4. kj says:

    (Sorry, I’m a bit of a broken record these days. It’s stress. LOL)

    Okay, so. Pamela and I were talking about John Kerry’s great use of “under the wire” technology. Well, that’s what I’m talking about in the above post. Find people who are doing what the contract talks about above, and then write about them. For a local paper, don’t come from an overtly political point of view. Come from a values point of view, as Lakoff and Wallis suggest. Come from a “this is America” “this is what I was taught in school, church, as a child,” etc. At the end of the article, or somewhere inside, talk about Democratic values, or something, but, at least in the red area I’m in, coming full-on as a liberal means whoever is reading will quit reading as soon as they see a bias. Gotta do the soft sell. Velvet glove. Etc. Go under the radar.

    And then repeat. 😉

  5. kj says:

    And truly, every small town or suburb as a paper, either a daily or a weekly, that’s desperate for copy. They’ll take a 400-500 guest editorial. I have yet to meet anyone here who couldn’t easily write a compelling essay on any one of those subjects listed above.

  6. kj says:

    Okay, back to work. Sigh. I guess who I’m really talking to is all the people in my area that I can’t get to write… bright, intelligent people with wonderful stats and points of view. And they won’t submit anything to the paper. Nothing. Not a word. Just me and one lovely retired old Professor who writes a letter to the editor every week. And he’s getting a bit senile, I hate to say.

    Oh, so blue, in a sea of red, red. LOLOLOL

    (Ps. Pamela, if I show up on your doorstep, don’t be surprised.)