Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young Join Body Of War Soundtrack

Billboard reported today that “Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young and Peal Jam have contributed tunes to the anti-war soundtrack for a documentary about a U.S. soldier paralyzed in Iraq.”

The 30-song, two-disc album “Body of War: Songs That Inspired an Iraq War Veteran” will be released March 18 via Warner Music’s Sire Records label. All proceeds from the sale of the album will benefit Iraq Veterans Against the War.

The film, “Body of War” focuses on “Tomas Young, an Army soldier paralyzed upon arriving in Iraq.”

It will open on March 13 in Austin, Texas, and expand nationally in subsequent months. Talk show veteran Phil Donahue directed the film with Elaine Spiro.

The album was put together by Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder, who composed the first single, “No War,” specifically for the film. Pearl Jam’s live version of Bob Dylan’s “Masters of War” also graces the soundtrack.

Springsteen contributed “Devils & Dust,” and Neil Young “The Restless Consumer.” Other tracks include “Yo George” from Tori Amos, “Son of a Bush” from Public Enemy, and “Bushonomics” from Talib Kweli & Cornel West.

DevilsĀ & Dust:
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2 Responses to Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young Join Body Of War Soundtrack

  1. Slave Revolt says:

    Yes, I admire all these talented, inspired, pro-peace artists.

    But, let’s state the obvious: even for these decent folks it is still politically problematic to put a human face on the tens of thousands of maimed and murdered Iraqi people.

    I wonder what the US government is doing for them?

    For years I have noted the dearth of coverage concerning the children maimed by the US ‘shock and awe’.

    More, neither Obama or Hillary are prepared to venture into this territory.

    I want to know their stories and their names.

    Adult US soldiers are victims of corporate/state propaganda (fascism) that glorifies and justifies imperialism, that makes class exploitation seem ‘natural’ (aka ‘the will of God’)—but they still make the ultimate decision to ‘believe’ the empire’s propaganda. The Iraqi children had no choice–as the bombs rained down and the fires burned their parents.

    Speaking out on this issue can see a person become a ‘national security risk’, or on a ‘no-fly’ list, etc. If you express concern for the Iraqi children and want to know their names and their fate, you could very well lose your job, your health insurance, and your home.

  2. Slave Revolt: I hope that there is an element of hyperbole. I’m not seeing anything where I’m at that looks like a price to be paid for dissent. The last time I actually saw things like you describe was in the sixties.