More On Republicans for Obama

Dallas News reports that early voters are swarming Texas. The other day I worte about the movement of some Texas Republicans who are planning to vote for Obama in the primary and then switch back to vote for McCain in general election. Some of us are concerned about this. The Houston Chronicle has a piece on this today. The gist of the story is many of these Republicans are voting for Obama, simply to make sure that “Hillary gets out.”

Michael Jones, a 39-year-old self-described conservative Republican who is involved in marketing, said he will cast his vote for Obama in the primary “so Hillary gets out.”

Jones apparently “isn’t enamored of Obama” and says he feels he has little substance, a complaint that has been echoed by many here. Jones said, “I just wish he would get some substance.” It’s the anyone but Clinton vote that appears to be driving these voters towards Obama

Even though polls show that Clinton would be a weaker candidate against McCain than would Obama, experts say Republicans, who have long expressed a visceral distaste for Bill and Hillary Clinton, want to prevent her from being on the ballot in November.

“The argument I’ve seen is, ‘Let’s get rid of Clinton once and for all,’ ” said Ralph Bordie, who conducts the IVR Poll in Texas.

Bordie’s latest statewide poll released last week found that 15 percent of Texas Republicans who said they will support the GOP nominee in November plan nonetheless on voting for Obama next week.

Debi McLoughlin, a 52-year-old Department of Public Safety worker who was waiting while her daughter had her hair cut, said she usually supports Republicans. But she is likely to declare herself a Democrat so she can choose Obama.

“A vote for Obama is a vote against Hillary,” said McLoughlin. She may also vote for Obama again in the general election because she thinks the 71-year-old McCain is too old.

Across the street having lunch at Maxine’s restaurant, Dot Berkner, a Republican, said she will check the polls right before the primary, and if Clinton is ahead, she will vote in the Democratic primary.

“I don’t want her in the final choice,” said Berkner, who added she will vote for McCain in the general election.

Some Obama supporters in the blogosphere don’t want to look at the possibilty of this being an issue in the general election or even the idea that voters are not on board with Obama because they actually like him or find him inspiring. Progressive bloggers like myself who have questioned this have taken heat from fellow progressive bloggers, as I noted here a couple of days ago. Maybe it won’t make a world of difference come general election time, but I certainly have a quesy feeling about it and others do too. Taylor Marsh and Jeralyn have more. I think there’s room here to ask, just who is choosing our nominee?

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8 Responses to More On Republicans for Obama

  1. Such, it seems to me, are the failings of a two party system. I can’t imagine how this same issue could ever develop in a country with an array of parties that cover the entire political spectrum. If Obama voters don’t like superdelegates, I wonder how they would feel about their guy having to go up against Hillary head to head in trying to put together a coalition of nothing but that sort of political professional so that someone could emerge as the Prime Minister.

    In a system like that Hillary could be put in office in short order if Obama made it and then truly was in as far over his head as her voters are convinced of. I don’t know, after BUSHCO there’s just something negative to me in the thought of getting someone in for four years and then having to keep them there no matter how poorly they perform.

  2. Steve Cohn says:

    Hi-
    One comment on the republicans voting for Obama to get Hillary out. I won’t debate that as you have a bunch of articles supporting it, but I also think the Republicans would rather run against Hillary than Obama (that’s per polling data, not my opinion).

    So, another question is would the Republicans risk a tougher fight in the general election just to get Hillary out?

    Do they want to lose the battle or the war? If anything, it seems McCain is going after Obama more than Hillary. Is that in preparation for the general election or is he trying to, and dare I say it, help Hillary?

    Just food for thought….
    Take care!

  3. Steve Cohn says:

    let me modify my second paragragh to…
    “So, another question is would the Republicans risk a WHAT THEY PERCEIVE AS A tougher fight in the general election just to get Hillary out?

    I’m trying to keep the post nuetral….
    Thanks

  4. Steve Cohn says:

    let me modify my second paragragh to…
    “….. the Republicans risk a WHAT THEY PERCEIVE AS A tougher fight in the general election just to get Hillary out?

    I’m trying to keep the post nuetral….
    Thanks

  5. cindy says:

    As a Florida Democrat, it infuriates me that the DNC will not count MY vote but
    will count the votes of Republicans to determine OUR nominee!!

  6. Steve Cohn says:

    Cindy- Very good point.
    Why did the “powers that be” move the date of your primary that ended up disqualifing your votes? I don’t understand why they did that. Who did it?

  7. cindy says:

    The Florida Legislators and Governor thought it would be a grand idea as did
    some Democratic Legislators. Republicans however control the State, both houses
    and the Governorship.

    When Dean threatened to take the delegates if the primaries were moved
    he first had that at 50%, later they amended to 100%. In the meantime, the
    Republican controlled Legislators dangled carrots, in the one hand they held
    paper trail ballot legislation and in the other hand they held homestead exemptions.
    They then had this all tied into the same vote to move the primary. How were they
    to tell voters they voted against these two items just to keep the primary in Feb?
    The Republican Governor signed the new date into law. Dean and the DNC said
    the Fla Democrats didn’t try hard enough, as if it were a simple task to get Republicans
    to work with you! The RNC took delegates away as well, but, they only took
    50% and let the candidates campaign.

  8. bjerryberg says:

    Rock-Star marriages tend to be very short and scandalous.

    Do Dems really want to marry a Rock-Star?

    Four major articles published in the British
    press over the last couple days support an assessment
    that Barack Obama is very disposable in the view of
    Wall Street’s senior partners in the City of London, who have
    heretofore uncritically promoted him as a Clinton-stopper.

    * The Times Online 2/25: “Barack Obama embarrassed by
    billionaire link to home deal … Exclusive: British-Iraqi
    billionaire lent millions of dollars to Barack Obama’s fundraiser
    just weeks before an imprudent land deal.” The story raises the
    question of whether an earlier $3.5 million loan from Nadhmi
    Auchi to Antoin Rezko in May 2005, “made it possible for the
    Obamas to purchase a mansion they could otherwise not afford.”

    * Sunday Observer 2/24: “The week the Obama backlash
    started,” says that “a media backlash is now showing clear signs
    of gathering pace,” and that “All over America, reporting teams
    are now investigating Obama’s record.”

    * Sunday Telegraph 2/24: “Barack Obama criticised over
    ‘cult-like’ rallies,” comparing Obama’s political rallies to “the
    hysteria of a cult, or the fervour of a religious revival.”

    * The Times 2/25: “America starts to sober up from a heavy
    dose of Obamamania.”

    Note also that a hapless Texas state Senator who had endorsed Obama was asked by Chris Matthews
    to name Obama’s achievements–and could not come up with one. (The video is quite popular on You Tube.)
    And a week or so back the same Matthews was gushing with Obama-mania.

    The crash-and-burn on this is apt go quickly. Dems might not want to get married to a rock star.