A Poem for Neda Agha Soltan (1982-2009)

Neda Agha Soltan died Saturday in Iran. She was an Iranian student who was shot by a single bullet amid the protests following the Iranian election. Her last moments were captured on a video that has gone beyong viral to global.

Via the NY Times and The Writing Life II:

A Poem for Neda Agha Soltan (1982-2009)
Written by Mandana

Stay, Neda—
The twittering birds,
Green-garbed forests,
Scented blossoms… all sing
of spring’s arrival
Don’t go, Neda…

Stay, Neda—
Sing with your people in the streets
Say, Long live life!
Down with death!
Tell the sun to shine,
the cold to depart
Don’t go, Neda…

Stay, Neda—
Look at this city
At the shaken foundations of palaces,
The height of Tehran’s maple trees,
They call us “dust,” and if so
Let us sully the air for the oppressor
Don’t go, Neda

Don’t be afraid
It is the sound of fireworks, not bullets The offspring-sparks of a great flame We are aflame, Fueled by baton-cracks and gunshots We are ablaze Don’t go Neda…

Oh Neda, Neda!
Shatter the cage
Break through the bars
Don’t go, Neda

Don’t go, Neda—
Look beyond the clouds
Lady sun is breaking through
She is just like you
Don’t go Neda
Oh God, don’t go…

Will Bunch has more on Neda… and please read Roger Cohen in the NY Times: Life and Death in Tehran.

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4 Responses to A Poem for Neda Agha Soltan (1982-2009)

  1. amin says:

    iran ehsase sharm kard

  2. Sarah says:

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    that I’ve really liked reading your blog posts. Anyway
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  3. Hannes says:

    Neda Salehi Agha-Soltan (1982 – June 20, 2009) is an Iranian woman whose fatal shooting on 20 June 2009 provided a rallying cry for Iranians protesting that country’s 2009 presidential elections.

    Agha-Soltan was the middle child and only daughter of a middle-class family of three children, whose family resided in a fourth floor apartment on Meshkini Street in the the Tehranpars neighborhood of Tehran. Her father is a civil servant and her mother is a homemaker. She graduated from Islamic Azad University, where she had studied the traditions and values of Islam as well as the philosophies of the world.

    Agha-Soltan was an aspiring, underground Persian popular singer and musician, who was studying her craft through private voice and music lessons. She had studied the violin and had an as-yet-undelivered piano on order at the time of her death.She worked for her family’s travel agency. Agha-Soltan loved travel, having saved up enough to have gone on package tours with her friends to Dubai, Thailand and Turkey. She had studied Turkish, in hopes that it someday would aid her as a guide for Iranians on foreign tours there. It was in Turkey.

    Those who knew her maintain that Agha-Soltan had not previously been very political – she had not supported any particular candidate in the 2009 Iran elections – but that anger over the election results prompted her to join the protest.Her voice and music teacher, Hamid Panahi, who was accompanying Agha-Soltan during the protest and can be seen on the video trying to comfort the dying woman, told the media: “She couldn’t stand the injustice of it.” Panahi went on to state: “All she wanted was the proper vote of the people to be counted. She wanted to show with her presence that, ‘I’m here, I also voted, and my vote wasn’t counted’. It was a very peaceful act of protest, without any violence.”

    friend Neda says (Neda happy was a girl who wanted freedom for all), Neda wrote for friend that day,Quote from Orod Bozorg “Hard days to reach greatness is.”

    On June 20, 2009, at around 6:30 pm, Agha-Soltan was shot and killed allegedly by security forces during a protest against the outcome of the 2009 Iranian presidential election.

  4. Ishnum Munshi says:

    When I heard about the story I was immediately moved to write a song about the personal tragedy and what it seemed to symbolize. It just makes you think would you love your country enough to go and be part of a demonstration – or even just witness it ? Or would you just stay cowering in your house listening to noises outside?
    Isn’t it love of your country to stand up and take to the streets to see positive change in progress? Wouldn’t you be ashamed if years on your granchildren asked you what you did and you said “nothing – the authorities told us to stay at home?”
    My song’s on youtube: “One Lost Vote”