New Majority Coalition

On Tuesday, November 6, 2012, Americans, despite fierce opposition, just may have become the great melting pot Dr. Martin Luther King once dreamed America could be. A coalition made up of Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians; both straight and gay, of all different ethnic and religious backgrounds; young and old came together to re-elect President Obama to this nation’s highest office; however, this coalition is not a new phenomenon to American politics.

In the 1980’s Reverend Jesse Jackson once called this coalition the “Rainbow Coalition”. Critics of the Rainbow Coalition said that Whites, Hispanics and Asians would never truly trust Black leadership; therefore, the coalition would not sustain significant political power. In my opinion four years under the leadership of a Black president has changed that perception. What is my proof you may ask?

The demographic of voters clearly shows respectability to President Obama’s leadership. While Gov. Romney received an overwhelming amount of support from white constituents contributing 88% of his vote white voters made up more than half of President Obama’s vote at 56%. In addition President Obama’s voter support among minorities was far greater and diverse being 24% Black, 14% Latin, and 4% Asian. Contradictory, Gov. Romney’s voters were only 2% Black, 6% Latino, and 2% Asian.[1] 

Furthermore, never in the history of this country has a President been more publicly disrespected by his peers and systematically set-up for failure by his political opposition. The President, despite being out spent two to one by the Republican supported super PAC’s, won the election handily. No amount of money, intimidation, influx of pro-Romney e-mails from supervisors to subordinates, or good old fashion voter suppression could stop a movement that I like to call “The New Majority Coalition”. As a result of an outstanding ground game by President Obama’s campaign and an electorate which uses the internet and social media to form its opinions as opposed to allowing political pundits to dictate opinions the political landscape of America has officially changed for generations to come.

There could however be some setbacks to this not so new coalition that now has power. The coalition can be severely fractured as a result cultural difference within the coalition which will lead to setbacks. For example, a potential setback already being implemented is religious leadership reminding their Black and Hispanic congregants that we are Christians who believe homosexuality is a sin. Another setback may arise once President Obama is no longer at the top of the ticket. African- Americans and young people have registered and voted in record numbers both years President Obama was at the top of the ticket, but registration and voting scaled down during non-Presidential election cycles.

It is my position this is where both Presidents Obama and Clinton can play a valuable role in shaping this country, even more so than the combined sixteen years they will have spent as president. These men coming together and endorsing center-left candidates, an action which will not alienate any one group in the coalition, could very well keep the coalition together despite internal and external threats to political position and policy. These two men could undoubtedly become the vanguards of the progressive movement and leaders of the “New Majority” for the next thirty years. If this coalition stays intact the American people can go a generation without electing a Republican president. The New Majority Coalition, if organized, could not only elect progressive minded Presidents, but also elect Governors, Senators, and Representatives at both the state and national levels for years to come.


[1] Thompson, Derrick. “2 Graphs That Should Accompany Every Discussion of the GOP’s Demographics Problem.” The Atlantic. 9 November. 2012

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About David Washington

Graduate of Norfolk State University Summa Cum Laude BA in Political Science, Navy Veteran, Former Obama Campaign Staffer, and Campaign Manager to Chesapeake Councilmember Ella Ward
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