The Day John Kennedy Died

Sadly, we recently lost Lou Reed, but his song is among the many poignant remembrances of John F. Kennedy that has been with us for many years…  

George Tames/The New York Times

George Tames/The New York Times

Check out Adam Clymer’s piece in the NY Times: ‘Kennedy Has Been Shot’: Memories From Nov. 22, 1963

I was the most junior reporter in the Washington bureau of The Baltimore Sun. On what was expected to be a dull Friday afternoon in the capital, I had taken off from work. My wife and I were driving north to meet her parents in New Haven for the Harvard-Yale game. When the news came over the car radio, I turned around and drove as fast as I could to get back to the office.

Also read this fascinating piece about how different media coverage was 50 years ago today. There was no 24/7 news machine in those days, but families everywhere remained glued to the TV’s.

UPI’s White House Correspondent Merriman “Smitty” Smith was in the Kennedy motorcade, riding in a “press car four cars behind the president’s open limousine, as John F. Kennedy drove through Dallas on Nov. 22,” read his eyewitness account of Kennedy’s assasination.  

Finally, JFK’s nephew, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., has written a piece on JFK’s “attempts to halt the war machine.”

On November 22nd, 1963, my uncle, president John F. Kennedy, went to Dallas intending to condemn as “nonsense” the right-wing notion that “peace is a sign of weakness.” He meant to argue that the best way to demonstrate American strength was not by using destructive weapons and threats but by being a nation that “practices what it preaches about equal rights and social justice,” striving toward peace instead of “aggressive ambitions.”

George Tames/The New York Times

George Tames/The New York Times

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