Lessons from the Trump-a-Thon

  by Walter Brasch The four day Trump-a-thon, sometimes noted as the Republican National Convention, ended this week in Cleveland, with the Republican party still divided and Donald Trump’s ego inflated larger than a Macy’s parade balloon. Trump was all over the convention hall, the hotels, and in the media, chatting, arguing, scowling, and boasting. It was Trump’s convention, and he knew it. Trump had begun his run for the nomination with a simple but powerful campaign theme, “Make America Great Again,” refusing to accept the reality that most countries see the United States as the world’s most powerful country and its president is one of the world’s most respected leaders. Slipping into the campaign, promoted by the Tea Party … Continue reading

The Plagiarists Double Down

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This is evidently not the first time he’s stolen Queen music, nor the first time he’s been caught stealing music for his rallies. That track record of theft of intellectual property makes it rather difficult to make the case that they couldn’t possibly have stolen a nice chunk of a Michelle Obama speech. Continue reading

Bathrooms are the New Battlefields for Politicians

  by Walter Brasch   When I was a junior at San Diego State, I had a sudden urge to need a restroom. The closest one was clearly marked, “Faculty Men Only.” The nearest one for male students was on the other side of the building. I did what any rational person would do—I used the faculty restroom. One of the professors, who was using a urinal a couple spaces away, told me the restroom was for professors only. (I assumed there were separate restrooms for staff.) “What department are you in,” asked the prof. In my deeper voice, I responded I was with sociology, hoping he knew little about the sociology faculty. “Just out of grad school?” he asked. … Continue reading

Senators Embedded Within a Brain Fog

    by Walter Brasch   The U.S. Senate—under the leadership of Mitch McConnell who once said his primary mission was to see that the Senate didn’t agree with anything President Obama said or did, and to limit him to one term—continues to be one of the nation’s leading obstructionists. This time, the Senate isn’t meeting to advise or consent to the President’s nomination of Chief Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court. Garland was valedictorian in his class at Harvard College and magna cum laude from the Harvard law school. He worked in the Department of Justice before becoming the chief judge on the D,C. Court of Appeals, having been confirmed by the Senate, March 1997. The reason for … Continue reading

The Art of the Double-Dealing Megalomaniac

  by Walter Brasch   Savannah State University in Georgia will offer a three-credit course this summer, “The Trump Factor in American Politics.” The professor is Dr. Robert Smith, who says the students will read Trump’s policy statements and excerpts from Trump’s books, and then discuss his political philosophies. Many people may believe this is a terrible waste of any student’s mind and tuition payments. Some may even claim there are other courses that have higher value in the American educational system. For example, Rutgers offers “Politicizing Beyonce,” Skidmore College offers “The Sociology of Miley Cyrus,” the University of Missouri offers a class to better understand Kanye West and Jay Z, and hundreds of colleges have courses that look at … Continue reading

I Thought the GOP was AGAINST Big Government

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We ought to be chilled. Instead, this will be cast into another “us versus them” bit of minor pettifoggery, while the intent to use government as a tool of political vendetta looms large already, without a Trump presidency that would almost undoubtedly be partially devoted to settling all and any scores, old and new.
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Disenfranchising Large Segments of Americans

  by Walter Brasch   Several hundred thousand American citizens won’t be voting in presidential primary elections—and it’s not their fault. In Pennsylvania, for example, a registered voter who needed an absentee ballot had to submit the request at least one full week before the election, and then return the ballot no less than four days before the election. But, what if circumstances changed? What if that person became injured or had to leave the state after April 19, but before the election, Tuesday? If it was April 20, you could not receive an absentee ballot. You could still vote in person, but if you couldn’t get to the polls, you would be disenfranchised. There’s nothing you could do. In … Continue reading